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video thread

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Great video and good review of the V60 Polestar.

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In case anyone doesnt follow B2G

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It's laps like that that make me think I'm not going to lift for the Foxhole... until I actually get there and bottle it.

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Enjoyed that vid, just need bigger balls now.

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It's laps like that that make me think I'm not going to lift for the Foxhole... until I actually get there and bottle it.

Yep :lol:

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if anyone hasnt seen it

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And a good comparison of the porker and lambo

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I watched one of these yesterday, he let off into the foxhole and has some funny lines into corners, like very early turn in points.  Is this the best line for the car or is the car capable of more?

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Big advantage of that car is not "only" more power and its reduced weight.

The Performante has something called like active aerodynamic/aero vectoring, here some rumors (copied from another site):

The Performante’s trump card, however, is its wild aero, dubbed Active Lamborghini Aerodynamics.

Three electric motors operate two separate flaps in the front bumper and rear wing, which operate differently depending on which of the three drive modes is selected.

In Strada, all four flaps open at 70km/h until 310km/h, at which point the front flaps close to reduce lift and maintain stability at v-max.  

In Sport, all four flaps again open at 70km/h, but close at 180km/h to maximise downforce for high-speed cornering until 310km/h,

at which point the rear flap opens to again reduce drag like the DRS system on an F1 car.

But it’s in Corsa where the system really shows its worth, with all four flaps operating independently depending on the Performante’s lateral and longitudinal requirements.

For example, under braking all four flaps close to increase downforce and stability,

however during cornering the rear outer flap opens to reduce the load on the heavily worked outer tyres while the rear inner flap remains closed, increasing the downforce on the inner wheels.

Lamborghini calls it ‘aero vectoring’, simulating torque vectoring using the power of the air, as well as the ability to increase downforce under braking while reducing drag on the straights.

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26 minutes ago, raceandsound said:

Big advantage of that car is not "only" more power and its reduced weight.

The Performante has something called like active aerodynamic/aero vectoring, here some rumors (copied from another site):

The Performante’s trump card, however, is its wild aero, dubbed Active Lamborghini Aerodynamics.

Three electric motors operate two separate flaps in the front bumper and rear wing, which operate differently depending on which of the three drive modes is selected.

In Strada, all four flaps open at 70km/h until 310km/h, at which point the front flaps close to reduce lift and maintain stability at v-max.  

In Sport, all four flaps again open at 70km/h, but close at 180km/h to maximise downforce for high-speed cornering until 310km/h,

at which point the rear flap opens to again reduce drag like the DRS system on an F1 car.

But it’s in Corsa where the system really shows its worth, with all four flaps operating independently depending on the Performante’s lateral and longitudinal requirements.

For example, under braking all four flaps close to increase downforce and stability,

however during cornering the rear outer flap opens to reduce the load on the heavily worked outer tyres while the rear inner flap remains closed, increasing the downforce on the inner wheels.

Lamborghini calls it ‘aero vectoring’, simulating torque vectoring using the power of the air, as well as the ability to increase downforce under braking while reducing drag on the straights.

It could be all that..... or did they just cheat?

Also

http://www.bridgetogantry.com/blog-did-lambo-fake-that-laptime/

Oooooh controversy

 

dunno either way tbh (although the main straight speed and time based on calculated speeds over known distance is impossible to ignore) and very much doubt we will ever know for sure one way or the other

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yeah, i have seen that too on different sites (///M Forum/Porsche etc...) and as you already said, we will never get the truth.

For me, i will never understand, why a manufacturer try to cheat...yes, i know, they all cheat, just to show, they have the best car...

All of this very fast lap times (918, Gumpert Apollo, GTR, whatever,...) didn´t provide a proper full report (only a video).

When i know, i have designed/manufactured a very fast car, why ffs not make it official with a known or certified third party group with proper equipment?

Provide them a protocol/check list with tyre pressure, wheel alignment, check of Engine ECU with a dyno, etc...

Same with all the tests in the car magazines...

for example...Test from some hot hatch´s, which one had semi slick tires on it or another test was in wet condition and oh wonder, the 4WD won...^^

Once i visited a dyno with about 8 or 9 F82 M4...nobody had 431HP...range was from 450 to around 490.

Anyway, the Performante has a lot of features to be a very fast car and as written above, we will never ever know, if it was that fast...

 

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Racelogic got involved and killed the main straight theory

 

"Real or Fake? There is some controversy brewing over the recent video posted by Lamborghini showing a 2017 Huracan Performante clocking a 6m52s lap of the ring. This piqued our interest, so here is our (somewhat geeky) analysis: 

The distance between the gantry and bridge is 1727m which was calculated in Circuit Tools using some customer VBOX data. This was then confirmed using the measuring tool in Google Earth. We then integrated the speed from the on-screen telemetry data on the Lambo every second using the built-in video time-stamps to obtain distance travelled. This data was obtained by stepping through the video in a video editor and entering the displayed speed every second into Excel. When integrated, the telemetry data made it 1728m from gantry to bridge, so the reported speeds and times between these two points on the circuits matched the real world distance precisely. This means that the speeds on the videos seem entirely realistic. 

We then analysed the engine sound (using an FFT analysis) from the Huracan at top speed on the same straight, which showed a maximum of just under 7750 rpm on the rev counter. This analysis showed a strong peak at 640Hz which equates to 7680rpm for a V10. Therefore our opinion, based on both pieces of evidence, is that the video has not been speeded up. Next time, it would be a lot easier if they used a VBOX Video ;)"

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